ADVANCED BUSHCRAFT GEAR

Advanced Bushcraft Gear.jpg

This section focuses on the bushcraft gear that you don't necessarily have, but want... It's about that high-end bushcraft gear that is good quality and should last a lifetime. Like I said in the beginning, Bushcraft is about experience and knowing how to use nature to your advantage. You don't really need any gear at all to learn Bushcraft. But along the way, there are items that are practical to help you along your journey. This gear is expensive, I'm not going to lie. But I figure that by this time you will have been practising Bushcraft for a number of years and you have a comprehensive set of wilderness and survival skills. Most of this gear is fairly bespoke, and therefore not really available on Amazon. In cases where it isn't, simply click the image and it should take you to that particular products website. But I will try and put in Amazon links where I can to make it more helpful. They are affiliate links, so if you do end up purchasing through the amazon links, it really helps to support my channel.

BUSHCRAFT KNIFE

There are a huge variety of Bushcraft knives out there. With all different styles, patterns and materials. There generally comes a stage in Bushcraft where you want a custom made knife. Or a high quality, hand made knife that you would love to eventually pass down the generations of your family. These knives come with a hefty price tag. But it's not just the knife that you are paying for, it's the hours of hard work by the knife maker. Every detail, down to the pins used to keep the handle together. It's all about quality. Here is an example of a few knife makers which craft some of the best knives I have ever used and seen:

BUSHCRAFT SAW

You'll likely be a seasoned camper now, and will have done multiple day camping trips. You might be looking for slightly more extreme wilderness trips, perhaps in colder climates. For this you may be doing a lot of sawing. Whilst the small folding saw's are more than adequate, a larger saw blade will help you process wood much faster. For this there are two great saws in my opinion: The Boreal 21 by Agawa Canyon. Or the Silky Katanaboy/ Silky Zubat by Silky Saws. Both very different looking saws but equally very good at processing larger pieces of wood. 

SILKY KATANABOY (UK)

BOREAL 21 (US)

BUSHCRAFT BACKPACK

Whilst the 40L backpacks posted in the "intermediate" section are more than adequate for overnighters, you might be wishing to go down the more traditional waxed canvas route, or perhaps a better brand that better fits the items that you carry with you while out in the woods. Either way, Frost River packs have a great vintage look to them if you want to go down the tradition route. Fjallraven also make hard durable backpacks, but from more modern materials. I'll leave some links below for you to look at. 

FROST RIVER GEOLOGIST (UK)

FJALLRAVEN STUBBEN 27L (US)

WATER BOTTLE/CANTEEN

You might be wishing to upgrade your water bottle/canteen set to a titanium one. These are much lighter than stainless steel, however, they are also more expensive. Either way, titanium is a very strong and durable material, but you are paying for the lightweight attributes of it.

TOAKS TITANIUM MUG (UK)

KEITH TITANIUM CANTEEN KIT (US)

BUSHCRAFT PANTS / TROUSERS

You may have noticed that in general bushcrafters tent to wear similar pants or trousers. That's because they have reinforced knee and rear areas (the areas that see a lot of ground!) and are generally more durable then standard outdoor hiking pants. They range in price and a number of companies do them. The two most popular are probably Fjallraven and Pinewood. I have put links to both below. 

FJALLRAVEN VIDDA PRO (UK)

PINEWOOD LAPPLAND (UK)

FJALLRAVEN VIDDA PRO (US)

PINEWOOD LAPPLAND (US)

BUSHCRAFT BOOTS

A good quality of boots is essential for any time of outdoor activity. I personally tend to use a range of walking/hunting/hiking boots. The two top brands that I feel are best suited to Bushcraft are Lowa and Hanwag. The Lowa Hunter GTX Evo or the Hanwag Tatra GTX or Tantra Top GTX are both solid boots. 

LOWA HUNTER GTX (UK)

HANWAG TATRA TOP GTX (UK)

LOWA HUNTER GTX (US)

HANWAG TATRA TOP GTX (US)

BUSHCRAFT WOOL SHIRT

Essential in those cold winter months, a wool shirt is great for keeping you warm. Wool shirts are fairly common and easy to find, however, be sure to check any labels before buying and ensure that it is made of wool or a wool blend and not a fake wool material. Fjallraven probably come up top when it comes to wool shirts used in the Bushcraft scene. Most of my shirts have at least 25-30% wool in. 

FJALLRAVEN GRANIT SHIRT (UK)

FJALLRAVEN GRANIT SHIRT (US)

SLEEPING PAD

When doing winter overnight camping trips, and sleeping on the ground, you will definitely need a sleeping pad or air mattress to bounce thermal heat back to your body and to keep you warm throughout the night. It's important that your body is off of the ground. For me you can't go wrong with a Thermarest Neoair Xtherm. It's pricey, but it's compact and lightweight. Ideal for the longer backpacking trips. 

THERMAREST NEOAIR XTHERM (UK)

THERMAREST NEOAIR XTHERM (US)

4 SEASON SLEEPING BAG

When it comes to winter camping you will most likely need a 4 season sleeping bag. There is a large range out there, and the rating of the sleeping bag generally depends on the temperature of the climate that you are in. For example, where I am based in the south of England, rarely do we get temperatures go below -6 degrees celsius. The north of England around -12 degrees celcius. In other parts of the world such as North America it can average about -25 to -30 degrees celcius in some areas. So really you need to do a lot of research into the ratings of your sleeping bag that would best suit your climate. A good brand that is used here in the UK is Robens, but Fjallraven also do some great extreme winter sleeping bags. 

GEAR SUMMARY

So as you can probably tell, the advanced bushcraft gear has a much higher price than the gear I posted in the beginners section. That's because generally speaking, you pay for what you get. Buy cheap, buy twice is a common saying. In my opinion, if you buy a quality item, it should be made of better quality material and should therefore last longer than cheaper items. The gear listed above is by no means a "must have" in your bushcraft kit. Many of these items listed above are luxury items. You can get by just fine without them. However, as stated in previous sections, you do not have to buy all of this gear at once. You can upgrade individual items over time and before long you will find  yourself at a stage where you will think enough is enough and you will stick with the gear that is tried and tested by you. I hope that some of you have found this information useful. If you have, I would be grateful if you could share these pages with your friends. And if you have purchased through these amazon links I am even more grateful as it really helps to support me and my channel. Thanks for your support! 

- Mike